An Advocate Earth Day Questionnaire

  Celebrating our 50th year of Earth Day since its founding in 1970, much has changed on the cosmic home-speck we call Earth – yet very little in the way of conservation to the great biodiversity whose demise has been on the chopping block of human exploitation and encroachment.  

Perhaps the greatest gift we could offer Mother Nature this year is the distance we provide while confined to our dwellings, during this worldwide pandemic. Nonetheless, for those of us who are starving for the splendors of the outdoors, we can take a moment to shed some perspective on our connection to the Earth. 

Here is a prompt to get you thinking about your seat in the stars. Repost and share your answers as you wish, or stow them away as your own personal time capsule to look back on in years to come.  

  1. What objects from nature are represented in your home or living space? What do these items mean to you?
  2. What is your favorite animal or organism on Earth? Do a bit of research about the biological role they play, and write down what you find most intriguing.
  3. What’s your favorite season? What smells, sounds, or other senses do you associate with this time? Do any memories stick out in particular?
  4. Where are your go-to places in nature? What feelings or thoughts arise when you visit?
  5. Do you have a favorite tree or type of tree? What draws you to it/them?
  6. What rocks or crystals are you drawn to and why?
  7. If you could manipulate any of the elements – earth, air, fire, water – which would you choose and why?
  8. What animals have crossed your path, either lately or historically, in dreams or in waking? What do these animals symbolize in ancient or indigenous cultures? What messages might they be sending?
  9.  Where are your ancestors from, and what were their cultural norms, ideals, or relationships with nature and the Earth? What lessons were passed down to you?
  10. Share an excerpt or a bit about your favorite author(s), poet(s), artist(s), musician(s), etc., that draw from the natural world. What have their works taught you?

By Stevie Beisswanger